NORTH CAROLINA DOT: ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF TOLLS ON I-95

NORTH CAROLINA DOT: ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF TOLLS ON I-95

north carolina dot: economic analysis of tolls on i-95

 
interstate 95 (i-95) in north carolina is an important part of the local, regional, state, and national transportation system. i-95 traverses 182 miles through eight counties (robeson, cumberland, harnett, johnston, wilson, nash, halifax, and northampton) from the virginia border to the south carolina border. these eight counties comprise the i-95 corridor region for the purpose of the current study and report. i-95 in north carolina was first built between 1956 and 1980, and with a few exceptions, it is basically the same four-lane highway today as when it was first built. thus, it does not meet the most current interstate design standards.
 
the north carolina department of transportation (ncdot) recently completed an evaluation of safety, connectivity and efficiency improvements needed to upgrade the 182-mile stretch of i-95 in nc. this work, the i-95 corridor planning and finance environmental assessment (ea) recommended widening the interstate to a combination of six and eight lanes, repairing pavement
deficiencies, raising and rebuilding bridges, improving interchanges, and bringing i-95 up to current safety standards. the total cost for making these improvements is approximately $4.4 billion; however, current funding levels do not adequately cover these improvement needs. about $455 million (roughly 10 percent of the funding need) in existing funding (programmed and anticipated funding) has been identified through the statewide transportation improvement program (stip). in the ea, ncdot identified tolling as the most feasible financing option to fund the proposed improvements within a reasonable timeframe.